Acer Nitro XV282K Review

  • By: admin
  • Date: April 16, 2022
  • Time to read: 5 min.
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The Acer Nitro XV282K  is definitely a top quality monitor. In addition to the increased graphical capability of both PCs and consoles, the combination of 4K (3840 x 2160) resolution and high refresh rate can be tantalizing. 

Acer’s XV282K KV (XV282K KVbmiipruzx) of the Nitro XV2 Series offers this, as well as AMD FreeSync Premium and Adaptive-Sync. HDMI 2.1 with VRR (Variable Refresh Rate) support is also available. 

Due to this, the high refresh rate and resolution combination plus VRR can be delivered to not just PC users, but also to other platforms such as the Xbox Series X and PlayStation 5. This monitor also focuses on viewing comfort, with ‘Eyesafe’ certification and Acer’s ‘VisionCare 3.0’ sensor suite.

 A light sensor automatically adjusts the brightness and color temperature, while a proximity sensor dims or turns off the screen if no one is using it. Here is our extensive review of the device.

Specifications:

Screen Size:

28-inch

Resolution:

3840×2160 (UHD)

Panel Type:

IPS

Aspect Ratio:

16:9 (Widescreen)

Refresh Rate:

144Hz

Response Time (GtG):

1ms (GtG)

Motion Blur Reduction: (MPRT)

Visual Response Boost

Adaptive-Sync:

FreeSync (48-144Hz)

HDMI 2.1 VRR (48-144Hz)

Speakers:

2x2W

Ports:

DisplayPort 1.4, 2x HDMI 2.1,

USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 65W PD)

Other Ports:

Headphone Jack, 4x USB 3.0

Brightness:

300 cd/m²

Brightness (HDR):

400 cd/m²

Contrast Ratio:

1000:1 (static)

Colors:

1.07 billion (8-bit + FRC)

90% DCI-P3

HDR:

DisplayHDR 400,

8-zone edge-lit local dimming

VESA:

Yes (100x100mm)

 

Pros

Cons

Acer Nitro XV282K Monitor – Design and Features

Acer Nitro XV282K has a clean design. There is a large, round base with a small red ring and a metal column. The monitor has a thin 8mm bezel on the sides and top, and a larger 21mm chin on the bottom. On the left chin, there’s a small Acer logo and a barely noticeable proximity sensor. In terms of build quality, the chin is a bit of a letdown – it feels quite creaky.

The stand tilts from -5° to 25°, swivels 360°, and lifts about 120mm (4.7″). This makes switching from portrait to landscape a breeze.

Acer Nitro XV282K has a clean design. There is a large, round base with a small red ring and a metal column. The monitor has a thin 8mm bezel on the sides and top, and a larger 21mm chin on the bottom. On the left chin, there's a small Acer logo and a barely noticeable proximity sensor. In terms of build quality, the chin is a bit of a letdown - it feels quite creaky. The stand tilts from -5° to 25°, swivels 360°, and lifts about 120mm (4.7"). This makes switching from portrait to landscape a breeze.

The proximity sensor houses “LightSense,” “ProxiSense,” and “ColorSense.” LightSense detects ambient light and adjusts the monitor accordingly. ColorSense adjusts your color temperature based on ambient light, while ProxiSense tells you to take a break if you’ve played for too long. (Even after some long gaming sessions, I never saw the ProxiSense warning.)

Four buttons and a directional joystick are located around the back of the device, allowing you to navigate its minimal OSD features with ease.

XV282K features a 27″ panel with UHD (3840 x 2160) resolution. AMD FreeSync minimizes latency and prevents screen tearing. Additionally, the XV282K is capable of supporting the PS5 and Xbox Series X at 4K resolutions and 120Hz refresh rate – or you can play PC games at 4K and 144Hz.

 

The XV282K has a brightness of up to 300 nits in standard definition and 400 nits in HDR. Speakers that aren’t going to impress anyone are included, as well as a headphone jack.

Image Quality

Acer Nitro XV282KKV uses an Innolux M280DCA-E7B IPS panel. Despite not being used in the low-blue light picture mode, this new panel emits less harmful low-blue light.

Blue light wavelengths are shifted from 450nm to 460nm, so you get less harmful blue light without compromising color fidelity. Therefore, the XV282K KV has the new Eyesafe certification from TÜV Rheinland.

Additionally, the panel has the common IPS qualities, such as 178° wide viewing angles and accurate, consistent, and rich color reproduction with a wide 90% DCI-P3 gamut coverage.

It also features sRGB emulation mode with adjustable brightness if you want to restrict its native ~120% sRGB gamut to ~100%.

The OSD (On-Screen Display) menu offers several color modes under the ‘Color Space’ setting, including sRGB, Rec.709, HDR, DCI, EBU, and SMPTE-C.

Dithered 10-bit color depth (8-bit + 2-bit FRC) is supported for 1.07 billion colors, with 12-bit as an option over HDMI 2.0 via additional dithering.

The contrast ratio is 1,000:1, which is expected from IPS technology, while the peak brightness is 400-nits for HDR content and 300-nits for SDR. If you don’t enable the ‘Max Brightness’ option, the monitor’s brightness will be limited to 150-nits.

Although the monitor has VESA’s entry-level DisplayHDR 400 certification, it has an 8-zone local dimming solution, which can enhance HDR viewing in some scenarios.

It is necessary to set “HDR” in the OSD menu to either ‘Auto’ or ‘HDR-400’, since it is set to ‘Off’ by default.

Performance

With a low input lag of just *4ms, you will not be able to notice or feel any delays on the Acer XV282K KV monitor.

Additionally, it has a fast 1 ms GtG pixel response time, ensuring no visible trailing behind fast-moving objects.

Response time overdrive is available in three modes: Off, Normal, and Extreme.

As the ‘Extreme’ mode pushes pixels to change too fast, it causes overshoot, while the ‘Off’ and ‘Normal’ modes perform the same.

When using either Off or Normal overdrive mode at 120Hz and 144Hz, there is no noticeable ghosting or overshoot.

If you are using a variable refresh rate (VRR), such as AMD’s FreeSync Premium, NVIDIA’s G-SYNC Compatible, or HDMI 2.1 VRR, and your frame rate is around 60FPS (which dynamically changes the refresh rate to 60Hz to prevent tearing), overshoot will be evident.

Due to how demanding 4K UHD is, many games will run at 60FPS. At low frame rates, you’ll have to choose between getting some inverse ghosting – or screen tearing (with VRR disabled).

Design & Connectivity

Monitor stand offers full ergonomic support with up to 130mm height adjustment, 90° pivot, +/- 180° swivel, -5°/35° tilt, and compatibility with 100x100mm VESA mount.

It has a light matte anti-glare coating that prevents reflections without making the picture too grainy.

It features two HDMI 2.1 ports, DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode and 65W Power Delivery), a quad-USB 3.0 hub, a headphone jack, dual 2W integrated speakers, and a KVM switch.

It is important to note that HDMI 2.1 ports are limited to 24 Gbps and rely on DSC for 4K 144Hz. PCs and Xboxes don’t have this problem, but PS5 is limited to 4:2:0 chroma. Since the PS5 is limited to 4:2:2 at 4K 120Hz anyway, it’s not a big deal; text might appear a bit smudgy on colored backgrounds, but it’s not that noticeable in games.

Conclusion

There you have it – our comprehensive review of the Acer Nitro XV282K – one of the latest 4K 144Hz monitors on the market. Only one question remains: Does it offer good value for money?

Acer’s XV282K KV is an excellent gaming monitor with vibrant colors, crisp details, and smooth performance except for some overshot at lower frame rates with VRR enabled. LG’s model offers better performance and image quality for the same price, so if you can find it in stock, we recommend it over the XV282K KV.

Check out our top Acer gaming monitors with 240Hz here.

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